Oil & Gas Law Short Course for Afghan Government Officials

June 25, 2013 - July 2, 2013
Members of the Afghan delegation along with CLDP staff and expert advisors.

In Doha, Qatar last week, CLDP conducted a five-day intensive course on the basics of international oil and gas contracting for a delegation of 12 Afghan government officials.   CLDP experts provided lectures as part of the program, including law professors from Southern Methodist University and Oklahoma University, a partner from Norton Rose Fulbright, and a senior lawyer from Qatar Petroleum.  The delegation, consisting of lawyers from the Ministries of Mines, Justice and Foreign Affairs and two members of the Natural Resources Committee of the Afghan Parliament, represents the core Afghan government parties responsible for mineral resource legislation and regulation and contract negotiation and management. The program was part of CLDP's long-term effort to assist the Government of Afghanistan in the administration of international contracts for mineral resource development. 

Upcoming Programs

December 16, 2019 - December 17, 2019

On December 16-17, CLDP will held a two-day workshop on power project procurement. The workshop sought to improve the planning of bids from prep to closing through a discussion on international best practice relating to the request for proposals (RfPs), standardization of documents, designing a competitive bid round, evaluations and identifying gaps in the current legal framework. 

December 19, 2019 - December 20, 2019

On December 19-20, CLDP, in collaboration with Ethiopia’s Ministry of Finance and the Public-Private Partnership (PPP) Directorate, will hold a two-day workshop on PPP fundamentals. The workshop will highlight PPP process, structure economics, project financing, and revenue flow.

CLDP in Action

October 23, 2019 - October 24, 2019

On October 23-24 in Tunis, Tunisia, CLDP held a workshop to identify potential changes to Tunisian law that would encourage increased cross-border eCommerce transactions for both exports and imports. Over 40 representatives from several government ministries, the private sector, and the NGO community discussed potential amendments to Tunisia’s eCommerce law, customs procedures, central bank currency and payment rules, and other matters.  The participants offered sets of informal recommendations for further action.

ECommerce in Tunisia has not reached its full potential, although there are black market eCommerce websites. Legal changes could help Tunisian SMEs and individuals reach new markets, while also providing opportunities for US sellers.

Read More about Tunisia: CLDP Holds Cross-Border eCommerce Workshop