Federal Agencies

CLDP coordinates with many other U.S. federal agencies to improve the climate for business around the world. Agencies such as the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) provide funding for CLDP to conduct training programs and consultative visits that impart government-to-government expertise on how to harmonize laws, expand trade, increase governance transparency, integrate regional economies, and achieve compliance with international obligations, among other things.

Providing technical expertise

CLDP supports the work of many U.S. federal agencies by applying specific technical expertise that can be drawn from CLDP staff, other federal agencies, and the private sector to the relevant needs of the host country. For example, CLDP's efforts in the Middle East play a significant role in advancing the U.S. Government's objectives under the Middle Eastern Partnership Initiative (MEPI), administered by the State Department.

Increasing Enforcement Capabilities

Also, CLDP coordinates many judicial capacity building training programs in the field of intellectual property rights (IPR) protection and enforcement. This furthers the IPR enforcement capabilities of the impacted countries and increases their compliance with international standards in the field. As a result, it strengthens the enforcement mechanisms of countries in which many U.S. businesses operate or seek to operate. Thus CLDP's work in this area supports the goals of the Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator (IPEC), which is aimed at shutting down the piracy and illegal trafficking of counterfeited goods on an international level.

Enabling Efficient Partnerships

Moreover, CLDP has worked closely with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) on product standards; coordinated with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officials and their international counterparts; and facilitated numerous government-to-government dialogues and exchange of expertise between other U.S. federal agencies and their foreign counterparts. As a result of being able to directly identify and assess the legal reform and developmental issues that exist in a particular country, CLDP is often able to provide many federal agencies greater access to the critical decision-makers in their areas of concern and thereby create more efficient working partnerships.

If you represent a federal agency, please contact us for more information on how CLDP can work with you to help fulfill your agency's mission and objectives.

Upcoming Programs

November 19, 2019 - November 20, 2019

On November 19-20, 2019, in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, CLDP & ITA conducted a workshop on effective interagency coordination to facilitate comprehensive publication of trade-related and centrally-published information. Participants included technical representatives from the Honduran and Guatemalan Ministries of Economy, Customs, Health, and Agriculture, and Honduran private sector representatives. During the workshop the Honduran participants met with their U.S. counterparts from the Department of Commerce, Customs and Border Protection, Health and Human Services, and the Food and Drug Administration to learn best practices for coordinating across trade ministries and publishing trade-related information in a non-discriminatory, easy-to-access manner. With support from the Honduran-American Chamber of Commerce, the participants shared respective efforts to encourage trade through greater transparency and improve publication practices. This workshop was part of a multiphase effort to promote transparency, cooperation, and coordination within the Honduran government, and to improve interregional trade in Central America.

CLDP in Action

October 23, 2019 - October 24, 2019

On October 23-24 in Tunis, Tunisia, CLDP held a workshop to identify potential changes to Tunisian law that would encourage increased cross-border eCommerce transactions for both exports and imports. Over 40 representatives from several government ministries, the private sector, and the NGO community discussed potential amendments to Tunisia’s eCommerce law, customs procedures, central bank currency and payment rules, and other matters.  The participants offered sets of informal recommendations for further action.

ECommerce in Tunisia has not reached its full potential, although there are black market eCommerce websites. Legal changes could help Tunisian SMEs and individuals reach new markets, while also providing opportunities for US sellers.